Professionalism and Social Media

Professionalism and Social Media
January 13, 2020
Social Change Theoretical Application
January 13, 2020

Professionalism and Social Media

In today’s world, we live in a technology-based society. Social media such as Facebook, twitter, and blogs are used as platforms and outlets. Many in the nursing profession utilize social media, in which they are allowed to do , but “As nurses navigate social networking sites, chat rooms, blogs, and public forums, they – sometimes unknowingly – approach a dangerously thin line between professional and personal online etiquette and even run the risk of breaking federal and/or state laws” (EveryNurse, 2018). When asked to investigate my personal social media pages and find conversations or posts that may be inappropriate based on the professional standards of nursing, I was unable to do so on my own personal page. I take major caution in what I post on my social media. I do not post inappropriate things related to my own life or related to my profession. I also do not partake in any inappropriate posting from friends or family, I simply scroll past and ignore them. I have worked to hard on my education and career for it to be thrown away over something shared on a social media website.

Nurses hold many titles, one being a leader. It is the responsibility of a nurse to be professional when working, and when not working. As someone who works with the community, it is important to uphold this professionalism even in personal lives because we never know who may be watching us or browsing our social media pages. Examples of inappropriate topics to post about on social media include argumentative behaviors, references to drugs and alcohol, inappropriate humor, and privacy violations such as HIPAA (Edge, 2017).  Avoiding the violation of HIPAA is very important both inside of work and in personal lives. Both nurses and nursing students have been found to post what they believe to be harmless information on their social media, which turns out to be a breech of HIPAA. This includes posting information about clinical sites or where the nurse currently works, information about a patient such as diagnosis, emergency event, or procedure (Edge, 2017). This information can be found by others on social media, giving others the chance to identify the patient just by this information provided.

As a Christian, I share many of my values on my personal social media page. I often post about God and prayer. My social media is centered around my family and my values. In doing this, I am careful not to share anything that may be offensive to others. The two forms of social media I currently have are Facebook and Instagram, both are private, and I am very particular to who I approve as a friend on both.

I recently did a sweep of both and made sure that the things shared publicly are appropriate and in no way violate the professional standards I am to uphold as a nurse.
References

Edge, W. (2017, May 15). Nursing Professionalism: Impact of Social Media Use Among Nursing Students. . https://doi.org/10.4172/2472-1654.100068

How Nurses Should be Using Social Media. (2018). Retrieved from https://everynurse.org/blog/how-nurses-should-be-using-social-media/

 

 

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